Bacterial Isolates and its Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern in NICU

Authors

  • S Shrestha Department of Pediatrics, Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital, Dhulikhel
  • NC Shrestha Department of Pediatrics, Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital, Dhulikhel
  • S Dongol Singh Department of Pediatrics, Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital, Dhulikhel
  • RPB Shrestha Department of Pediatrics, Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital, Dhulikhel
  • S Kayestha Department of Pediatrics, Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital, Dhulikhel
  • M Shrestha Department of Pediatrics, Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital, Dhulikhel
  • NK Thakur Department of Microbiology, Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital, Dhulikhel

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/kumj.v11i1.11030

Keywords:

susceptibility, bacterial isolates, neonates

Abstract

Background
Neonatal sepsis is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among the newborns in the developing world.

Objectives
To determine the common bacterial isolates causing sepsis in neonatal intensive care unit and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern.

Methods
A one year discriptive prospective study was conducted in neonatal intensive care unit to analyse the results of blood culture and to look into the sensitivity of the commonly used antibiotics.

Results
The blood culture yield by conventional method was 44.13% with nosocomial sepsis accounting for 10.79%. 84.08% were culture proven early onset sepsis and 15.95% were late onset sepsis. Klebsiella infection was the commonest organism isolated in early, late and nosocomial sepsis but statistically not significant. Gram positive organisms were 39.36% in which Staphylococcus aureus was the leading microorganism followed by coagulase negative staphylococcus areus. Gram negative organisms were 60.64% amongst them Klebsiella was the most often encountered followed by Pseudomonas. The most common organism Klebsiella was 87.5% and 78.3% resistance to ampicillin and gentamycin respectively. Among gram negative isolates 87.5% and 77.2% were resistance to ampicillin and gentamycin respectively. Among gram positive isolates 58.5% and 31.5% resistance were noted to ampicillin and gentamycin respectively. Resistance to cefotaxim to gram negative and gram positive isolates were 87.34% and 59.35% respectively.

Conclusion
Klebsiella is most common organism which is almost resistance to first line antibiotics. Resistance to both gram negative and gram positive isolates among firstline antibiotics and even with cefotaxim is emerging and is a major concern in neonatal intensive care unit.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/kumj.v11i1.11030

Kathmandu University Medical Journal Vol.11(1) 2013: 66-70

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Published

2014-09-09

How to Cite

Shrestha, S., Shrestha, N., Dongol Singh, S., Shrestha, R., Kayestha, S., Shrestha, M., & Thakur, N. (2014). Bacterial Isolates and its Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern in NICU. Kathmandu University Medical Journal, 11(1), 66–70. https://doi.org/10.3126/kumj.v11i1.11030

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Section

Original Articles