Fragmented Subjects in Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections: A Critique of Globalization

Authors

  • Bhola Nath Chalise Assistant Professor, Department of English, Baneshwor Multiple Campus, Kathmandu, Nepal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/bcja.v2i1.55765

Keywords:

Globalization, fragmented subject, fragmented self, depression, gender, supply chain

Abstract

This paper argues that globalization results in producing fragmented self which contradicts its original promise of bringing about happiness and coherent personality as such. In other words, the study illustrates the paradox between the integrating promises and disintegrating effects of globalization and consumer culture in post-industrial America. Analyzing Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections, this study explores the dissociation in the life of the characters and the society they represent. The notion of globalization and generation gap brought by this phenomenon, the illusion that the drugs can cure depression and anxiety, passion over the financial market correction, question over sexuality and gender roles are some areas causing disorder in the life of the characters. This research is based on the cultural criticism of theories on globalization. Globalization is a multi-disciplinary phenomenon. So, to support the cultural aspect of globalization, I have, on and off, brought classical theory of macroeconomics that supports promises of globalization, and the concept of ‘supply chain’ to explain how those promises have been shattered.

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Published

2023-06-13

How to Cite

Chalise, B. N. (2023). Fragmented Subjects in Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections: A Critique of Globalization. Baneshwor Campus Journal of Academia, 2(1), 113–125. https://doi.org/10.3126/bcja.v2i1.55765

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Section

Articles