Self-Medication Practices in Pokhara: A Study of Knowledge and Purpose among Non-Medical Students

Authors

  • Chudamani Subedi Prithvi Narayan Campus, Pokhara, Nepal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/pjri.v3i1.41632

Keywords:

Knowledge, practice, prescription, self-medication, non-medical students

Abstract

This study has tried to assess the self-medication practice among non-medical students. For this purpose, data were collected from 206 Bachelor’s and Master’s level students by using self-administered questionnaire at Prithvi Narayan Campus, Pokhara. Quick relief from pain is one of the reasons for self-medication, followed by previous experiences of illness, pharmacist’s advice, ease and convenience and time saving. The majority of students has been practiced self-medication to treat headache (62.9%), fever (32.7%), gastric acidity (23.9%), cough (27.3%), common cold (34%), dental pain (18.5%) and dandruff (24.4%). Almost two fifth of the respondents (37.37%) had knowledge regarding the composition of drugs and minority (8.74%) that had knowledge about dose, content, therapy duration and reaction of the drug. In addition, the majority of the respondents practiced Antipyretic (38.6%) followed by analgesics (33.4%), general antibiotics (17.7%) and anti-ulcerants (14.1%) without proper consultation with professionals. The findings of the study showed that non-medical students had self-medication practices, depending on their age, gender and academic level. Due to a high level of practice on self-medication, the study recommended that the concerned authority should formulate a set of rules and implement to prevent such practices in the university, providing adequate facilities for healthcare medical treatment.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Abstract
96
PDF
145

Author Biography

Chudamani Subedi, Prithvi Narayan Campus, Pokhara, Nepal

Department of Statistics

Downloads

Published

2021-12-23

How to Cite

Subedi, C. (2021). Self-Medication Practices in Pokhara: A Study of Knowledge and Purpose among Non-Medical Students. Prithvi Journal of Research and Innovation, 3(1), 52–60. https://doi.org/10.3126/pjri.v3i1.41632

Issue

Section

Original Research Articles