Water Resources for Mutual Beneft - Nepal and India

Authors

  • Gyanendra Lal Pradhan Department of Electrical Engineer

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/hn.v7i0.4232

Keywords:

Storage projects, Food control, Regulated fow, Hydropower export, India, Nepal

Abstract

The huge water resources including hydropower potential of Nepal may be mutually beneficial to both Nepal and India. Storage projects need to be developed to utilize the monsoon season flows to have regulated flow with multiple benefits such as irrigation, food control, hydropower, etc. India will need an additional 200,000 MW of electricity by 2018. The cross border power trade will undoubtedly benefit both the countries. To exploit resources on mutually beneficial terms, we need to shift from "foreign policy" to "business mode," decreasing government engagements and increasing corporate relationships. Business to business initiatives will lessen any mistrust. Furthermore, water augmentation of the Kulekhani reservoir by pumping and constructing a high dam in the Jomsom area will significantly increase electricity generation in the existing plants.

Key words: Storage projects; Food control; Regulated fow; Hydropower export; India; Nepal

DOI: 10.3126/hn.v7i0.4232

Hydro Nepal

Journal of Water, Energy and Environment

Vol 7, July, 2010

Page: 26-29

Uploaded date: 31 January, 2011

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Author Biography

Gyanendra Lal Pradhan, Department of Electrical Engineer

Hydropower specialist and entrepreneur, is an Electrical Engineer by training. He is currently Executive Chairman at Hydro Solutions, Director of Butwal Power Company, Chairperson for Nepal Hydro & Electric Ltd.

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How to Cite

Pradhan, G. L. (2011). Water Resources for Mutual Beneft - Nepal and India. Hydro Nepal: Journal of Water, Energy and Environment, 7, 26–29. https://doi.org/10.3126/hn.v7i0.4232

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