Nepalese Trekking Guides: A Quantitative Study of Sexual Health Knowledge & Sexual Behaviour

Authors

  • Padam Simkhada International Health, School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR), University of Sheffield
  • E van Teijlingen CMMPH, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth House
  • P Regmi FHI 360 Kathmandu
  • P Bhatta University of Aberdeen, Scotland
  • R Ingham Centre for Sexual Health Research, University of Southampton
  • N Stone Centre for Sexual Health Research, University of Southampton

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/hren.v12i3.15319

Keywords:

Condoms, Himalayas, Lifestyle, Reproductive health, Tourism

Abstract

Background: Tourism, a global industry, brings with it a number of public health problems, one of which is the spread of sexually transmitted infections transmitted between travellers and hosts. Previous studies have largely focused on sex workers and sex tourists.

Objective: To assesses sexual behaviour, knowledge and condom use among male trekking guides in Nepal.

Methods: A self-administered questionnaire survey (n=324) was conducted using snowball sampling amongst men working as mountain trekking guides in Nepal.

Results: Most respondents (59%) had initiated sex before the age of 18. Most (84 %) reported sexual relations with a woman other than their partner, 46% reported foreign partners, 43% had Nepalese partners, and 28% had concurrent foreign and Nepalese partners. Most (70 %) reported ever having sex with a foreign woman and two-thirds had had sexual intercourse with foreign women in the previous 12 months. Participants’ age, education status, age of first sex, smoking and drinking habits and English proficiency were significant predictors of having sex with foreign women. About 60% reported condom use during their most recent occasion of extra-martial sex. A similar proportion had used a condom during last sexual intercourse with a foreign woman. The likelihood of condom use was associated with a guide’s age, educational level, ethnicity, age of first sex and work experience.

Conclusions: Most trekking guides reported sexual relations with foreign women as well as irregular use of condoms. Although sexual health knowledge about among trekking guides is high, some misconceptions still result in unsafe sex. Hence there is an urgent need to revise the existing training for trekking guides and implement appropriate health promotion programmes.

Health Renaissance 2014;12(3): 180-189

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Author Biographies

Padam Simkhada, International Health, School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR), University of Sheffield

Senior Lecturer

E van Teijlingen, CMMPH, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth House

Professor

P Regmi, FHI 360 Kathmandu

Sr Surveillance and Research Specialist

P Bhatta, University of Aberdeen, Scotland

MSc graduate

R Ingham, Centre for Sexual Health Research, University of Southampton

Professor

N Stone, Centre for Sexual Health Research, University of Southampton

Senior Research Fellow

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Published

2016-07-25

How to Cite

Simkhada, P., Teijlingen, E. van, Regmi, P., Bhatta, P., Ingham, R., & Stone, N. (2016). Nepalese Trekking Guides: A Quantitative Study of Sexual Health Knowledge & Sexual Behaviour. Health Renaissance, 12(3), 180–189. https://doi.org/10.3126/hren.v12i3.15319

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Section

Original Articles