Autoimmune thyroiditis: clinical presentation in a Nepalese population

  • K Paudel Barts Health NHS, Royal London Hospital, Renal Unit, London
  • B Paudel Department of Medicine, Charak Memorial Medicare Hospital, Pokhara
Keywords: Autoimmune, clinical presentation, Hashimoto`s thyroiditis, Hypothyroidism

Abstract

Background: Hypothyroidism has a wide range of clinical presentations. This study was conducted to describe the clinical manifestations of chronic Hashimoto`s thyroiditis (HT) in a Nepalese population. We also tried to identify symptoms or signs characteristic for HT.

Methods: During the study period, all newly diagnosed patients with hypothyroidism were interviewed about symptoms, and clinical signs were assessed. The data of hypothyroid patients were divided in two groups: TPO antibody positive and TPO antibody negative. The symptoms and signs of the two groups were analyzed and compared.

Results: Among the 88 hypothyroid patients, 33 (37.5%) had positive TPO antibody levels. Female patients were more likely to be TPO antibody positive (41.3% among female and 15.4% among male). The most frequent symptoms were lethargy, cold intolerance, constipation, tingling sensation and weight gain, and the most frequent signs were facial puffiness and non-pitting pedal edema, in both groups. Statistical analysis revealed, that cold intolerance, decreased appetite and insomnia were significantly more prevalent symptoms in the TPO antibody positive group (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Hashimoto`s thyroiditis is a common cause of primary hypothyroidism. It is not possible to differentiate it from the clinical presentation.

Nepal Journal of Medical Sciences | Volume 03 | Number 01 | January-June 2014 | Page 68-71

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/njms.v3i1.10362

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Abstract
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Published
2014-05-06
How to Cite
Paudel, K., & Paudel, B. (2014). Autoimmune thyroiditis: clinical presentation in a Nepalese population. Nepal Journal of Medical Sciences, 3(1), 44-47. https://doi.org/10.3126/njms.v3i1.10362
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Original Articles