Drivers of Land Abandonment in Neelakantha Municipality: Perceptions of Farmers

Authors

  • Pradeep Shrestha Nilkantha Multiple Campus, T.U., Nepal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/ejer.v5i1.65636

Keywords:

destruction of food crops by wild animals, high cost of agro product, land abandonment, out migration, rough topography

Abstract

This study analysed the role of factors for land abandonment in Neelakantha municipality, Dhading. For this purpose, survey and causal-comparative research design are used. Similarly, Reliability and normality of the collected data was ensured by using cronbach alpha and Shapiro-Wilk test respectively. Then after, inferential statistical tools i.e. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analysis have been used to derive the result of the study. This study found that there is a significant impact of high cost of agro product, out migration, rough topography, lack of government protection from international competition, and destruction of food crops by wild animals on land abandonment. However, the impact of irrigation facility and market access on land abandonment was not statistically significant. The findings of the study suggest that the factors that contribute to land abandonment are complex and interrelated. However, the study provides some evidence that the factors that were found to be statistically significant can play a role in land abandonment.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Abstract
39
PDF
19

Author Biography

Pradeep Shrestha, Nilkantha Multiple Campus, T.U., Nepal

Mr. Shrestha holds M.Phil. Degree in Economics from Tribhuvan University. He is currently associated with faculty of management of Nilkantha Multiple Campus. His areas of interest are international trade, monetary and agricultural economics.

Downloads

Published

2024-05-09

How to Cite

Shrestha, P. (2024). Drivers of Land Abandonment in Neelakantha Municipality: Perceptions of Farmers. The EFFORTS, Journal of Education and Research, 5(1), 61–72. https://doi.org/10.3126/ejer.v5i1.65636

Issue

Section

Research Article