Indigenous Rodhi Culture of Gurung and Factors of its Transform at Ghandruk Kaski in Nepal

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v17i01.61145

Keywords:

change, ghandruk, globalization, native, rodhi

Abstract

The Rodhi, a traditional cultural practice in Nepal, has lost its native form in recent years. It was popular in the Gurung community in Ghandruk, however, it is being transformed into a modern form popular in restaurants. This decline in native Rodhi is attributed to factors such as globalization, modern entertainment tools, and the shift from agriculture and animal rearing to films and dance bars. The study used qualitative data collection methods and an ethnographic study to analyze the changes in Rodhi culture. Twenty-seven participants were selected for the study, and data was collected through interviews, observations, narratives, discussions, and case studies. The findings revealed that modern entertainment tools, such as films, dance bars, Hindi and English films, hybrid music, and contemporary songs, have diverted the audience and participants from Rodhi's originality to youths. Globalization has led to cultural assimilation, with Gurungs being enlisted in services in Singapore police, Brunei reserve troops, French, British, and Indian armies have less prioritized Rodhi. Globalization encourages immigration, contemporary communication, mass media, overseas employment, cultural assimilation, and shifting traditional occupations. Cultural assimilation due to globalization confined Rodhi to nightclubs, affecting the traditional language and Rodhi culture among the Gurung community of Ghandruk. Cultural assimilation and socio-cultural effects contribute to the declination of traditional knowledge, local culture, and cultural identities like Rodhi. This study has implications for the preservation and promotion of traditional culture, benefiting cultural practitioners, activists, academicians, future researchers, and policymakers.

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Author Biography

Saroj Raj Panta, Department of Sociology/Anthropology, Dhawalagiri Multiple Campus, Baglung, Tribhuvan University, Nepal

Saroj Raj Panta (https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5745-6100) is Masters of Philosophy in Sociology from Nepal Open University. He currently works as a teaching assistant at the Department of Sociology/Anthropology, Dhawalagiri Multiple Campus, Baglung, Tribhuvan University, Nepal. Additionally, he writes articles on various current issues for local and national journals and newspapers. His areas of research interest include culture, gender, ethnicity, transformative learning, and disaster management. He has received several awards for his work, including the National Education Award from the Government of Nepal in 2069 BS, the District Education Prize from the District Education Office, Baglung in 2066 BS, the Hari Laxmi Narayan Prasad Memorial Journalism Award from the Nepal Journalist Federation, Baglung in 2077and Ratna Shrestha Provincial Award 2079, Ratna Shrestha Puraskar Guthi, Baglung.
Email: sarojpanta.sp84@gmail.com.

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Published

2023-12-27

How to Cite

Panta, S. R. . (2023). Indigenous Rodhi Culture of Gurung and Factors of its Transform at Ghandruk Kaski in Nepal. Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology, 17(01), 45–60. https://doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v17i01.61145

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Articles