Improved Health-Related Quality of Life with Superficial Femoral Artery Stenting in Intermittent Claudication Done Prior to Medical Treatment: A Case Report

Authors

  • Sushila Gyawali Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Lalitpur, Nepal
  • Sristi Singh Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Lalitpur, Nepal
  • Bibek Dhital Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Lalitpur, Nepal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/njr.v13i2.59970

Keywords:

Femoral Artery, Hemodynamics, Intermittent Claudication

Abstract

In cases involving TASC A lesions of the superficial femoral artery (SFA), the conventional approach typically starts with medical therapy and supervised exercise. When these measures fail to yield the desired results, endovascular procedures may be contemplated. However, in the distinctive case of a 68-year-old male, endovascular therapy was employed to reestablish blood flow through the obstructed SFA segment. This intervention substantially improved the patient’s ability to walk. Subsequently, the patient continued with optimal medical therapy. This integrated approach, beginning with SFA stenting followed by conservative care, promptly alleviated claudication-related symptoms, ultimately resulting in an enhanced quality of life

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Author Biographies

Sushila Gyawali, Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Lalitpur, Nepal

Resident, Department of Radiology and Imaging

Sristi Singh, Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Lalitpur, Nepal

Assistant Professor in Intervention Radiology, Department of Radiology and Imaging 

Bibek Dhital, Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Lalitpur, Nepal

Resident, Department of Radiology and Imaging

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Published

2023-11-24

How to Cite

Gyawali, S., Singh, S., & Dhital, B. (2023). Improved Health-Related Quality of Life with Superficial Femoral Artery Stenting in Intermittent Claudication Done Prior to Medical Treatment: A Case Report. Nepalese Journal of Radiology, 13(2), 35–38. https://doi.org/10.3126/njr.v13i2.59970

Issue

Section

Case Reports