Insights into the Connectivity of the Human Brain Using DTI

Authors

  • S Kollias Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Zurich

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/njr.v1i1.6330

Keywords:

Diffusion Tensor Imaging, human brain, white matter anatomy

Abstract

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a neuroimaging MR technique, which allows in vivo and non-destructive visualization of myeloarchitectonics in the neural tissue and provides quantitative estimates of WM integrity by measuring molecular diffusion. It is based on the phenomenon of diffusion anisotropy in the nerve tissue, in that water molecules diffuse faster along the neural fibre direction and slower in the fibre-transverse direction. On the basis of their topographic location, trajectory, and areas that interconnect the various fibre systems of the mammalian brain are divided into commissural, projectional and association fibre systems. DTI has opened an entirely new window on the white matter anatomy with both clinical and scientific applications. Its utility is found in both the localization and the quantitative assessment of specific neuronal pathways. The potential of this technique to address connectivity in the human brain is not without a few methodological limitations. A wide spectrum of diffusion imaging paradigms and computational tractography algorithms has been explored in recent years, which established DTI as promising new avenue, for the non-invasive in vivo mapping of structural connectivity at the macroscale level. Further improvements in the spatial resolution of DTI may allow this technique to be applied in the near future for mapping connectivity also at the mesoscale level.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/njr.v1i1.6330

Nepalese Journal of Radiology Vol.1(1): 78-91

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Published

2012-06-16

How to Cite

Kollias, S. (2012). Insights into the Connectivity of the Human Brain Using DTI. Nepalese Journal of Radiology, 1(1), 78–91. https://doi.org/10.3126/njr.v1i1.6330

Issue

Section

Educational Exhibits