Conservation Finance of Annapurna Conservation Area during COVID-19 Pandemic

Authors

  • Sujata Shrestha Institute of Forestry, TU
  • Rajesh Kumar Rai School of Forestry and Natural Resource Management, TU
  • Pratik Bhattarai Institute of Forestry, TU
  • Anup KC Department of Environmental Science, Amrit Science Campus, TU
  • Lokendra Adhikari Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation, Kathmandu

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3126/jota.v6i1.58583

Keywords:

Conservation, tourism, conservation finance, Rangeland, forest-based enterprises

Abstract

Annapurna Conservation Area is considered as the only self-financed protected area in Nepal. With the aim of investigating the impact caused by COVID-19 on income and expenditure of Annapurna Conservation Area and its conservation activities, the study gathered primary data by interviewing representatives from different committees related to tourism, youth, women, and local people. Similarly, audit reports from Conservation Area Management Committee offices and Annapurna Conservation Area headquarter office were taken as secondary data. The income reduced by 36 percent in the fiscal year 2076/77 as pandemic effects began and further plummeted by 96.5 percent after a complete lockdown and travel limitations in the following year. Consequently, expenses for thematic areas and budget allocation for different management committees significantly declined. As a result, the committees minimized but did not stop spending their budget on conservation initiatives. The study recommends diversifying the income sources of the conservation area through effective rangeland management, prioritization of forest-based enterprises, utilizing the available resources, and policy reform in tourism fee collection.

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Published

2023-09-19

How to Cite

Shrestha, S., Rai, R. K., Bhattarai, P., KC, A., & Adhikari, L. (2023). Conservation Finance of Annapurna Conservation Area during COVID-19 Pandemic. Journal of Tourism &Amp; Adventure, 6(1), 89–103. https://doi.org/10.3126/jota.v6i1.58583

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Articles