Hearing Loss among the Traffic Police in Kathmandu Valley – finding from a pilot cross-sectional study

  • Madhab Raj Bista Occupational Safety and Health Project (OSHP), Bhainshepati, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Pranab Dahal ECO Trans Consult, Kathmandu, Nepal
Keywords: Exposure, health effects, noise, service years, traffic police

Abstract

Background: Noise induced hearing loss has been increasing rapidly with the advancement of technological, industrial and anthropogenic growth. Hearing loss is identified to be minimizing psychosocial well-being of an individual and reduced economic activities apart from deafness. This study aimed to measure the noise induced health impairment in traffic polices of Kathmandu valley.

Methods and Materials: The cross-study was conducted among eighty traffic police in the Kathmandu and Lalitpur districts of Nepal. Purposive stratified sampling method was used for the study. A semi structured interview guide was developed to assess the physical findings and an audiometric test were also conducted with each individual traffic personnel to assess the hearing impairment.

Results: The study identified Chabahil in Kathmandu with highest level of noise at 90 A-weighted decibel. Overall, moderate hearing loss in the left ear was reported in 55% of the respondents and mild hearing list in right ear in 46.3% of the respondents. The study found bilateral moderate hearing loss in all the respondent serving more than twenty years in traffic management. The effects of getting tired (80%), difficulties in concentration (76.3%) and increased irritation (72%) were identified as the high ranked health effects.

 Conclusion: The study reinforces the need of further exploration as this occupational health issue is a growing public health concern.

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Abstract
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Published
2016-12-01
How to Cite
Bista, M., & Dahal, P. (2016). Hearing Loss among the Traffic Police in Kathmandu Valley – finding from a pilot cross-sectional study. International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health, 6(2), 1 - 5. https://doi.org/10.3126/ijosh.v6i2.22525
Section
Original Articles